Recipe For: Gourmet Italian Sweet Cream

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Bring your own personal Barista within out!  Whether you like coffee with your cream or cream with your coffee my recipe for homemade Gourmet Italian Sweet Cream coffee creamer holds no calories back.  This is a rich, full body, luscious creamer that will have your toes curling with goodness.  The only way to accomplish this is with REAL heavy cream.  That’s right, no skinny, minny, mojo whatever latte with water-“milk”.  That does not work with this gal.  Coffee is my number one vice in my life and I hold nothing back.  No imitation stuff up in here, up in here!

Okay, let’s get to the recipe! 

What You Need

  • 1 – 14 oz Can of Sweetened Condensed Milk
  • 14 oz (1 3/4 cup) Organic Heavy Whipping Cream
  • 2 Whole Organic Vanilla Beans Scraped Clean
  • 1 Teaspoon Pure Almond Extract (not imitation)
  • Large Container w/Lid (Old Store Creamer Bottle, Mason Jar)

How To Make

  1. To your container add sweetened milk, heavy cream, extract and your vanilla beans
  2. Tighten your lid and… shake shake shake, shake shake shake, shake your booty, shake your booty, baby.  This way you can burn a few calories off before using it 🙂  Shake for about 3 minutes.  You want it to blend really well.
  3. Mark your container with the same expiration date that came on your heavy cream container.
  4. Shake well between each use.

That’s it, honest, no really, that is all there is to making homemade cream.  No funny chemicals just pure goodness.  Oh, how could I forget?  You may need some amazing organic fair trade coffee with that cream.

I will be posting some lower calorie ones, I promise, in the meantime live life to its richest potential.

Until Next Time – Enjoy!

ᒍᗩᗰIE

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DIJS The Bean Slingin Barista

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Coffee and Roses: The Garden Experiement

If you love to grow roses and are a coffee drinker this gardening experiment I did will be right up your alley!  Coffee and roses, what’s not to love right?  Makes me kinda giddy all over thinking about them as a couple.  Hey, they say, opposites attract.

Three years ago I came across an article about using spent coffee grounds as a natural fertilizer for roses because coffee is high in nitrogen, plus to perform their best roses need neutrality to acidic soil.  This means by adding the grounds it will aid in the pH balance from neutral to acidic which roses thrive on and I’ve experienced it first hand.  It also helps loosen the soil, which gives the roots more space to grow and helps to deliver the nutrients they need to survive.

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I live in Tucson, Arizona which falls under Zone 9 Gardening  (if you want to know yours click here) and growing things here is a huge challenge but can be done.  Above is this year’s first bloom of “Queenie” our oldest rose bush who came with our home 8 years ago.  Queenie always had nice soft pink blooms, rather small, and never had a fragrance other than a “peppery” smell.  I decided to take that articles advice to see if I could improve on my rose bush.  Afterall, I am a coffee-o-holic so grounds are never short supplied at my house.

In the Fall of 2016, this mad scientist started saving coffee grounds.  Trust me when I say in my household it doesn’t take long.  I keep a large bowl on my countertop once the coffee is made, I empty filter from grounds into the bowl.  That’s it, seriously.  I let those grounds pile up, take the bowl outside and mix it into a little fresh garden soil (you don’t have to, just something I do) and I use three handfuls of the mixture around the base of the rose bush close to the root evenly than do a drip soak to allow the coffee to seep into the ground.  I do this twice a month.

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2016 – Spring.  I noticed my rose leaves were getting a deeper green color with some shine.  Prior to the experiment, they were dull green with yellowish edges and semi-lifeless. Okay, improvement so let’s keep going.  The first bloom of the season came along, Queenie produced about 3/4 more blooms! Still no scent improvement.  Continued coffee treatment for 6 months then the hard part…I stopped … experiment after all.  Now to wait and see.

2017 – Queenie still gets her normal rose feed, water, and conversation with me but no coffee.  She went back to being pretty but sad looking compared to 2016.  Blooms were sparse, leaves green but no shine, back to how she was prior to 2016. 😦 just a bit better.

2018 – I started the coffee fertilization again in January 2018.  Queenie had her first bloom April 2, 2018, she apparently is one happy rosie lady.  She made an amazing transformation and I must say, she loves coffee as much as I do and I started all my roses on the coffee regimen.  Look at the leaves, shiny, healthy and perky.  I never knew she had a two-tone pink coloration since I’d never seen it before and the coffee brought that out!  You can see for yourself.  The best part….scent!  OMGosh in 8 years all I smelled was a pepper like scent and now she has a soft rosie fragrance.   I call the experiment a success, don’t you?

TIPS ON MAKING COFFEE FERTILIZER

  • One way is to just put the coffee grinds in a compost heap with other waste from your kitchen, sprinkling the mixture around the roses.
  • Another method is to just sprinkle plain, dried up grounds at the base of your roses.
  • Additionally, you can mix 3 parts coffee grounds with 1 part wood ash to mix into the soil around the plants.
  • Finally, you can mix about a 1/2 pound of used grounds with 5 gallons of water for a mixture you can pour on the rose bushes about twice a month.  (My now preferred choice)

Oh and remember this, astonishingly as it may seem, bugs and pests are repelled by coffee grounds. Coffee is one of the few treats we enjoy that the pests won’t try to snag from our kitchens, or gardens, for themselves. Lovin’ it.

Be Well,

~J~ from Doing It Jamie Style

P.S. Speak with your local garden nursery for more advice on this tip and many others for your garden.  They’ll be happy you asked them!